Tag Archives: no kill equation

No Kill Miami Launches Campaign to Make Miami-Dade County Newest No- Kill Community in America

17 Oct

No Kill Miami is launching an unprecedented campaign to bring the Miami-Dade community and Miami-Dade Animal Services (MDAS) together, for the very first time, to end the killing of healthy and treatable animals at our tax-payer funded, open- admission shelter. This exciting collaboration will focus on implementing new lifesaving programs and policies based on the best performing shelters across the country.¬†Collectively known as the “No Kill Equation,” these programs and policies have helped numerous communities across the country achieve save rates of 90 percent or better.

“A collection of concerned animal-loving citizens, and leading animal welfare advocates, No Kill Miami is addressing a long-standing history of killing at MDAS. Miami-Dade Animal Services killed roughly 22,000 companion animals at the shelter last year, over 60 percent of all dogs and cats. We believe that staggering level of killing does not reflect our community’s values,” says Debi Day, Director of No Kill Miami.

With the appointment of a compassionate new director at MDAS, the opportunity for change is ripe, and No Kill Miami is calling on the community to support this new lifesaving mission.

We are asking the public to visit http://www.nokillmiami.org to learn about the many important ways they can help us end the killing today. For those without computer access, please call us toll free at 888-589-4188.

We are looking for a variety of volunteers to help us implement these No Kill programs, which include fostering neonatal puppies and kittens, promoting off-site adoptions, organizing fundraising events, providing pet owners with information to address behavioral and medical problems, and launching public relations and marketing campaigns to get the community involved in this exciting lifesaving mission.

About No Kill Miami:

NoKillMiami.org is an animal welfare think tank compromised of concerned animal-loving citizens, prominent figures in the community, animal welfare experts, animal law attorneys, shelter volunteers, and community veterinarians working to make Miami-Dade a No Kill Community.

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The No Kill Equation

31 Aug

For those who may be new to the No Kill movement, below is an explanation of the No Kill Equation (NKE). The NKE is the only program proven to lead to No Kill success. It involves 11 simple steps, which, when implemented by a shelter, lead to increased live outcome rates and drastic drops in killing.

The NKE has been successfully applied in Reno, Nevada; Tompkins County, New York; Shelby County, Kentucky; Charlottesville, Virginia, and many other communities across the US.

The No Kill Equation works, period. But, it does take hard work, dedication, and a compassionate, innovative leader at the helm. A halfhearted attempt at the programs will NOT be effective. They must all be aggressively implemented in order to reap the lifesaving rewards.

I. Feral Cat TNR Program

Trap Neuter Release (TNR) programs are the only proven effective methods of reducing a feral cat population, and No Kill communities across the country have embraced these tactics as a method of drastically reducing shelter intake and saving lives.

II. High Volume, Low-Cost Spay/Neuter

Low or no-cost, high volume spay/neuter programs are a key component to reducing shelter intake, and become especially effective over time. Reducing intake allows for additional resources to be allocated to other shelter necessities.

III. Rescue Groups

Rescue groups are an invaluable element of the NKE. Any transfer of an animal to a rescue group reduces taxpayer cost for vet care and boarding (or euthanasia), in addition to freeing up a kennel for another animal. A transfer to a legitimate rescue should never be refused by a shelter.

IV. Foster Care

Foster care is an irreplaceable way to drastically expand shelter capacity. Volunteer foster parents provide boarding, food and care for animals, and serve as key advocates for the shelter’s mission. These programs also save the lives of neonatal kittens and other animals who cannot survive in a shelter environment.

V. Comprehensive Pet Adoptions

You CAN adopt your way out of killing, but it takes hard work and innovation. There are 17 million families looking for pets each year, and three to four million killed in shelters. There are more than enough homes for our nation’s homeless pets, but shelters must compete with outside sources of animals – they must offer promotions, adoption specials and implement effective marketing programs to get pets out the door.

VI. Pet Retention

Many of the reasons people surrender their animals are preventable, but shelters must work with the public to help them retain their animals. Through offering advice and assistance to those in need, shelters can reduce intake and keep families together.

VII. Medical and Behavior Rehabilitation

A key part of any shelter’s responsibility is to insure the health & well being of its inhabitants. Animals must be treated for medical conditions and rehabilitated for behavioral issues. This step includes the implementation of proper cleaning, vaccination, evaluation and other protocols.

VIII. Public Relations/Community Involvement

Community support is key to No Kill success. By increasing public exposure for the shelter, the community will get involved, which means more donations, more volunteers, more adoptions and more lifesaving success.

IX. Volunteers

No Kill efforts cannot succeed without volunteers. They expand the shelter’s operational efforts without necessitating additional expense. They are invaluable, and the backbone of any successful shelter.

X. Proactive Redemptions

In Washoe County, Nevada, almost 65% of intake are returned to their owners, demonstrating the high percentage of animals that need only be  redeemed. Actively working towards RTO efforts can drastically reduce shelter intake and kill rates.

XI. A Compassionate Director

The number one most important factor in reaching a No Kill community is effective leadership. Unless a shelter’s leader is progressive, compassionate and hard-working, other efforts are likely to fail. The leader dictates the policies & procedures of the organization, and if a leader makes a decision to stop the killing – it will stop.